The Loreto Convent School Timeline

 

1585
 
Birth of Mary Ward
 

1611
 
Founding of the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary and the opening of the first school at St Omer in Belgium
 

1631
 
Suppression of the Institute by Pope Urban VIII
 

1645
 
Death of Mary Ward, But her followers kept alive her vision and inspiration
 

1688
 
Founding of the Bar Convent in York, England by Mother Frances Bedingfeld a follower of Mary Ward, First Convent to be opened in England after the dissolution of Monasteries in 1536 by Henry VIII
 

1794
 
Birth of Frances Ball in Dublin, Ireland
 

1821

 
 
Founding of the Irish branch of the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary, known as Loreto sisters, by Mother Frances Teresa Ball, who has been educated and trained as a religious at the Bar Convent in York. Her first Convent became known as Loreto Abbey, Rathfarnham, Dublin.
 

1841
 
The first Loreto Mission founded outside Ireland began in Calcutta.
 Followed by:
 

1845
 
Mauritius
 

1847
 
Toronto, Canada
 

1851
 
Manchester, England
 


1861
 
Death of Mother Teresa
 

1875
 
Ballarat, Australia
 

1878
 
Pretoria, South Africa. Mother Margaret Mary Jolivet, Mother Joseph Colahan and Mother Teresa Colahan opened the school at Loreto Convent Skinner Street on 7 June, with 20 pupils in the high school and 6 in the parochial school.
 

1880
 
Siege of Pretoria: Convent buildings were taken over by the military on 16 December. Mother Margaret Mary died during the siege 15.01.81
 

1881
 
March 27: Siege ends and school life resumes as normally as possible
 

1891
 
First Subsidy given to the school by Kruger Government on condition that Dutch was taught in the school
 

1893
 
Opening of Loreto Lydenburg. Another journey by ox wagon!
 

1899
 
Outbreak of the Anglo Boer War. School was temporarily closed. Mother Joseph and Mother Teresa went to Ireland to get help.
 

1905
 
The two Transvaal Houses come under the jurisdiction of Loreto Abbey Rathfarnham
 

1913
 
The Transvaal Houses are placed under the leadership of Mother Patrick
 

1914 - 18
 
World War I. Travel makes it impossible to get help in the form of personnel from overseas but school life proceeds as usual.
 

1922
 
New block built. (Present school offices and Grade 7)
 

1923
 
Branch House opened in Hillcrest
 

1924
 
Loreto Strand is opened
 

1928
 
Loreto Skinner Street celebrates its Golden Jubilee. Besides a drama production, the School's 35 piece Orchestra puts on a gala performance
 

1929 - 33
 
The Great Depression. Hard times for all and the number on the roll at Skinner Street drops
 

1939 - 45
 
World War II. Once again school proceeds as usual but it is not possible for new teachers to travel from overseas
 

1947
 
Smuts' immigration policy brings new pupils and new life to the school
 

1950
 
The Provincial Government passes the Language Ordinance restricting the admission to the school to English speaking pupils. Archbishop Garner challenges the Ordinance in the law courts. He wins his case in Supreme Court but loses it when the Province appeals to the Appellate Division. A costly exercise.
 

1953
 
Roll of Loreto Skinner Street reaches the highest ever: 853! Where did we put them?
 

1963 - 65
 
Vatican II. Many changes in the Church and incidentally in Religious Life are introduced. These have far-reaching effects on Loreto Convent Skinner Street, especially on the composition of the school staff
 

1971
 
First non-white pupil admitted to Loreto Convent Hillcrest. The daughter of the Malawian Ambassador. Skinner Street follows suit but the number of pupils of other races is limited by a quota system
 

1978
 
Loreto Skinner Street celebrates its centenary. A week of celebrations included a Pageant of the History of Loreto and a Mass for many Friends, Past Pupils, Parents and pupils. These events took place on the Hockey Field.
 

1980+
 
The effects of Vatican II began to be felt as the apostolate of Schools for the Sisters was superseded by apostolate for the underprivileged. This factor combined with the ageing process led to the sister being replaced by lay staff in our schools.
 

1985
 
We celebrate the 4th centenary of the birth of Mary Ward
 

1986
 
We receive the first Government subsidy for our schools since the day of Paul Kruger
 

1988
 
The running of Loreto Skinner Street is handed to a Board of Government
 

1989
 
The first lay Principal is appointed: Mrs Helen Addis
 

1994
 
We celebrate the bi-centenary of the birth of Mother Teresa Ball
 

1996
 
Mrs Renée d'Oliviera succeeds Mrs Addis as Principal, and two gentleman teachers join the staff
 

1997
 
October 7: Our long awaited new Hall is started
 

1998
 
March 3: The keys of the New Hall are handed over at a special ceremony.
June 1: Archbishop George Daniel blesses a commemorative plaque in our New Hall, followed on June 5 by the official opening, a Special Mass in the morning and a drama production by each section of the school in the afternoon and evening.
 
 

2003
 
The first Loreto Seminar is held at Loreto Queenswood
 

2006
 
Mr Stuart Shillinglaw succeeds Mrs d'Oliviera as Principal
The second Loreto Seminar is held at Loreto Skinner street
 

2007
 
High school for the first time appoints coordinators in different learning areas
 

2008
 
All the Sisters leave the convent. The school takes occupation of the convent to be used as media centre and extra offices
The new Daycare centre is opened and blessed by Father Victor
 

2009
 
The third Loreto Seminar is held at Loreto Queenswood

 

2016

Mr Stuart Shillinglaw retires as the Executive Principal of the School. Mrs Suzette Truter is appointed as the new Executive Principal, commencing duties for the 2017 academic year. 

2018

Loreto Convent School celebrates its 140th Birthday - what a milestone! A number of activities were held in celebration of the birthday, including a Gala Dinner, birthday cake for learners on the 7th June, a very successful Dance-A-Thon and other exciting events. 

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